44 Declassified Military Photos That Show The True Vietnam War (2022)

By All That's Interesting | Checked By John Kuroski

Published October 25, 2017

Updated April 22, 2021

These Vietnam War photos taken by U.S. Army photographers reveal a side of the conflict that few people have ever seen.

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After supplies and weapons were found in a Viet Cong tunnel network, a soldier burns a nearby hut used for rice storage by the Viet Cong. Bien Hoa. January 1966. Robert C. Lafoon/National Archives

(Video) 50 RARE AUTHENTIC PHOTOS THAT SHOW A SIDE OF VIETNAM WAR YOU DONT USUALLY SEE PART 1

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Two Viet Cong prisoners are led to an ARVN Command Outpost at Ha Tien. May 1970. James L. Ensign/National Archives

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Soldiers gather around a guitar player and sing songs after a long day during Operation Yellowstone. January 1968.Samuel L. Swain/National Archives

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Gas mask-clad soldiers stay low to the ground as they prepare for combat. Date unspecified.National Archives

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Prisoners eat a meal in their cell at Con Son Prison, which would later become the sight of the infamous "Tiger Cages" photographs. July 1970. A. Hill/National Archives

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In search-and-destroy missions, soldiers were ordered to destroy the homes of suspected Viet Cong in the hopes that it would cripple the resources and morale of the guerrilla force. In this image, an American soldier carries out these orders with a flame thrower. Date unspecified.National Archives

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Vietnamese Army personnel interrogate a Viet Cong prisoner. June 1962. Ted T. Tucker/National Archives

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Captain Carlisle Bastian and his company question three old villagers in the outskirts of Phu Dien Hai. 1967. Franklin G. Nickerson III/National Archives

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A soldier who has chosen to decorate his helmet with a plastic ox pauses and looks backwards. Date unspecified.National Archives

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National Archives

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Soldiers fire a mortar at a Viet Cong landing position. Long Khank Province. May 1967.James I. Hatton/National Archives

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Two soldiers watch as a suspected Viet Cong house collapses into flames. Date unspecified.National Archives

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A South Vietnamese Army interpreter questions a Viet Cong prisoner and translates the answers to Captain Dennis K. Anderson. September 1967.Robert C. Lafoon/National Archives

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Private First Class John J. Schult smiles as he reads a letter from home. Chu Lai. November 1967.National Archives

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SP4 Manuvel Y. Martines administers a penicillin shot to a Vietnamese farmer. Quang Nai Province. May 1967.James I. Ratton/National Archives

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A young Vietnamese man raises his hands in surrender as two American soldiers question him. Date unspecified.National Archives

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National Archives

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A soldier takes cover behind a stone wall in Tam Ky. 1969.L.T. Hawkins/National Archives

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(Video) 45 Powerful and Shocking Historical Photos From the Vietnam War

National Archives

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Soldiers take cover behind a line of shrubbery as helicopters fly overhead. Date unspecified.National Archives

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A member of the Department of the Army Special Photographic Office, a small, highly trained unit of Army photographers, looks through his camera. Date unspecified.National Archives

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Two American medics remove a wounded Viet Cong fighter from a Medivac helicopter. Chu Lai. November 1968.Franklin G. Nickerson III/National Archives

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Four prisoners captured in a Viet Cong tunnel complex wait for transfer to a prisoner-of-war camp. Thanh Dien. January 1967. Edward Kane/National Archives

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Female Viet Cong POWs cover their heads as they wait to be transported to the release point. Can Tho. February 1973. Richard Hiwa, Jr./National Archives

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People taken prisoner by the ARVN wait for a helicopter to transfer them to a release point. Tay Ninh. March 1973.Richard S. Hiwa, Jr./National Archives

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A member of the South Vietnamese Women's Army Corps oversees a sewing class at a prison camp. November 1968. National Archives

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North Vietnamese POWs leap out of boats upon their release from captivity and are greeted by military personnel. North Quang Tri Province. February 1973. DeLaurier/National Archives

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Soldiers on a search-and-destroy mission move through an area that had been previously cleared by supporting artillery. April 1965.Howard C. Breedlove/National Archives

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National Archives

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Soldiers load into a Chinook helicopter as they prepare to be airlifted to their next position. April 1966.Howard C. Breedlove/National Archives

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Soldiers leave a helicopter and seek new positions. Xa Cam My. April 1966. Howard C. Breedlove/National Archives

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National Archives

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National Archives

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Photographer Ted Acheson questions a Vietnamese family whose home was destroyed. Date unspecified.National Archives

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An armored helicopter prepares to land troops in an area where a suspected Viet Cong outpost is located. Quang Ngai Province. April 1967. Howard C. Breedlove/National Archives

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Solders climb a ladder into a Chinook helicopter during Operation Cedar Falls. January 1967.Francisco J. Salas/National Archives

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National Archives

(Video) 30 Photos Of The Vietnam War You Must See!

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SP5 Paul S. Hernandes examines a Vietnamese child's throat during a medical aid operation in Xuan Vinh Refugee Resettlement Camp. September 1967.SP5 Robert C. Lafoon

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National Archives

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National Archives

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SP4 Warren Cunningham, a grenadier, stands by civilians who were found in a village during a search-and-destroy mission and lights of their cigarettes. In all probability, the homes of these civilians are being burned down out of frame. Quang Nai Province. January 1968. Carl C. Hansen/National Archives

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Captain William J. Winham prepares to lead his company on a search-and-destroy operation with foliage in his helmet to provide camouflage, and a cigarette. Binh Doung Province. June 1967.Howard C. Breedlove/National Archives

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National Archives

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National Archives

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44 Declassified Military Photos That Show The True Vietnam War (45)

44 Declassified Military Photos That Show The True Vietnam War (46)

44 Declassified Military Photos That Show The True Vietnam War (47)

44 Declassified Military Photos That Show The True Vietnam War (48)

44 Declassified Vietnam War Photos Taken By U.S. Army Photographers

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History is not a fixed set of facts. In reality, it is a collection of ideas, images, and information that enough people have chosen to preserve and disseminate. Necessarily, more is lost to time than is remembered. Photographs, and visual media generally, play an especially important role in this process of shaping collective memory of an event.

During the Vietnam War, for example, photographs and footage brought the conflict home to the American people. Shocking images such as Nick Ut's "Napalm Girl" and Eddie Adams' "Saigon Execution" have become synonymous with the widespread outrage and disapproval of the war in the United States.

Given how large the canon of Vietnam War photojournalism is and the level of infamy much of it has achieved, it may be surprising to learn that a wellspring of Vietnam War photos from a source other than photojournalists has been largely ignored: the works of military photographers.

Though their works have been declassified over time and physical copies are carefully preserved at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland, it is estimated that less than a quarter of military images from Vietnam were ever made available to the press. In the rare cases where they were published or broadcast, the photographers were rarely credited.

This pattern is not unique to the Vietnam War. The United States military has had designated photographic units since the Signal Corps began taking photographs in the 1880s. They were created to document operations, equipment, and people, as well as to create a visual record of the conflict.

When acknowledged in popular media, however, military photography is often written off as a public relations mouthpiece for the U.S. military, à la Full Metal Jacket. However, the fact that these Vietnam War photos were not intended for publication suggests that photographic units and their commanders perhaps had less incentive to misrepresent or sanitize American military actions in conflict zones.

In interviews, Vietnam War-era military photographers have revealed that they do not recall being told to depict any subjects in a way that favored the U.S. military. Instead, military photographers were often simply told to "go find some action," and were allowed to use their discretion when it came to documenting things like violence and gore.

The result is an extensive and nuanced body of work. It is neither a gritty, unfiltered depiction of combat nor a highly censored attempt to make Americans look honorable. Though the images rarely focus on the carnage of war, they offer surprisingly frank depictions of search-and-destroy missions and prisoner-of-war camps. They place as much emphasis on the thrill and terror of combat as they do on the agonizing waiting periods that fall between the action.

These Vietnam War photos are a key part of understanding soldiers' experiences during the conflict and provide insight into operational specifics that were unknown to the press.

Though these Vietnam War photos have not yet pierced the public consciousness in the same way that civilian photojournalists' images have, the historical record is truly not complete without them. Ultimately, what is the point of creating a visual history if no one sees it?

Next, see what the Vietnam War looked like for those who fought it in this CBS News footage that captured a battle in action in the jungles of Vietnam near Cambodia in March 1970:

After viewing the Vietnam War photos above, have a look at two of the era's most iconic images: "Napalm Girl" and the Saigon execution. Then, see the war's horrifying aftermath with this look at the Agent Orange victims who suffered through one of history's worst chemical attacks.

FAQs

What were two iconic pictures of the Vietnam War? ›

Eddie Adams' image of the execution of a Viet Cong member on the streets of Saigon and Nick Ut's photo of a little girl running naked down the street after being burned by napalm are two examples of “iconic” photos as defined by scholars.

Which photo stopped Vietnam War? ›

Associated Press photographer Nick Ut's photograph of Kim Phúc running naked amid other fleeing villagers, South Vietnamese soldiers, and press photographers became one of the most haunting images of the Vietnam War.

How gruesome was the Vietnam War? ›

An estimated 500 Vietnamese, mostly women, children, and the elderly, died in the massacre. The brutality has been well documented: American soldiers raped, mutilated, and tortured the villagers before killing them; families were dragged from their homes, thrown into ditches and executed.

What was the most feared unit in the Vietnam War? ›

Surprise attacks by elite Communist units known as sappers were one of the most serious—and feared—threats to Americans in Vietnam.

What is the most famous photo of the Vietnam War? ›

'The Terror of War'

The title of this photo says it all, “The Terror of War.” Vietnamese-American photographer Nick Ut won a Pulitzer Prize for his 1972 image of innocent children fleeing an accidental napalm attack on their village.

What was the bloodiest day in Vietnam? ›

November 19, 1967 was one of the bloodiest days for American troops in the Vietnam War.

What happened to the girl in the Vietnam picture? ›

The iconic photo of Phan Thi Kim Phuc as a 9-year-old surviving a napalm attack became a defining image of the Vietnam War. Kim Phuc sought political asylum in Canada nearly 30 years ago. She now lives outside of Toronto. And a warning: Some viewers may find graphic images in this segment unsettling.

Is napalm same as Agent Orange? ›

Agent Orange, which was used during the Vietnam War to clear dense vegetation, is a deadly herbicide with long-lasting effects. Napalm, a gel-like fuel mixture that burns slowly and more accurately than gasoline, was used in bombs.

How many tanks were lost in Vietnam? ›

Total: at least 321 M48 tanks. According to official US data, 343 M48s were delivered to the ARVN up to March 1975. The US lost at least 123 M48 tanks (non-repairable) during the war. As a result, the US and ARVN lost about 500 M48 tanks total.

What did the Vietnam War smell like? ›

In the back of a candy shop in Hai Duong, another man recalled: “The war smelled of burnt nylon.” That was just one day of almost 40 we spent in Vietnam, over three years, capturing testimonies and images of more than 100 North Vietnamese veterans and their families.

Did 17 year olds fight in Vietnam? ›

James Ward was one of at least 18 juvenile soldiers killed at Vietnam—five were 16, like him, 11 others were 17, and one was 15 and had forged his birth certificate to join. And his death led the military to change its rules about juveniles in combat.

Who did the Vietcong fear? ›

TIL That during the Vietnam War, the most feared soldiers by the Vietcong were not US Navy Seals but Australian SASR. The VC referred to SEAL's as "The men with Green faces" whereas SASR known as "The Phantoms of the Jungle.

What was the deadliest job in Vietnam? ›

Overall, the U.S. military used nearly 12,000 helicopters in Vietnam, of which more than 5,000 were destroyed. To be a helicopter pilot or crew member was among the most dangerous jobs in the war.

What was the most decorated unit in Vietnam? ›

24. Project Delta, Detachment B-52, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), the most decorated single unit in the Vietnam War, had a memorial stone dedicated in their honor and placed in the Memorial Plaza at the USASOC headquarters.

How many Vietnam War veterans are still alive today? ›

"Of the 2,709,918 Americans who served in Vietnam, Less than 850,000 are estimated to be alive today, with the youngest American Vietnam veteran's age approximated to be 60 years old."

Which famous image from 1975 exemplified US failure in Vietnam? ›

Eddie Adams's photo of Brigadier General Nguyen Ngoc Loan shooting a Viet Cong prisoner is considered one of the most influential images of the Vietnam War. At the time, the image was reprinted around the world and came to symbolise for many the brutality and anarchy of the war.

Who is the most famous person in Vietnam? ›

Nguyen Minh Triet (President)

He was promoted to the Party Political Bureau in 1997 then leader of the Communist Party of Saigon in 2000. He then launched a campaign against organized crime and corruption, making him one of the most famous people from Vietnam.

How many soldiers died on their first day in Vietnam? ›

997 soldiers were killed on their first day in Vietnam. 1,448 soldiers were killed on their last day in Vietnam. 31 sets of brothers are on the Wall. Thirty one sets of parents lost two of their sons.

Could the US have won in Vietnam? ›

In conclusion, the evidence clearly suggests that the United States could have never have won the Vietnam War.

How many green beret were killed in Vietnam? ›

Because of the top-secret nature of the MACV-SOG, no official memorial service was held in Vietnam for the fallen Green Berets. The 17 Green Berets who were killed on that fateful day are: SSG Talmadge Horton Alphin, Jr. PFC William Henry Bric III.

Does napalm melt skin? ›

Napalm's Effects on Health and the Environment

It's very sticky and can adhere to the skin even after ignition, causing terrible burns. Because napalm burns so hot, slight contact with the substance can result in second-degree burns, eventually causing scars called keloids.

Is napalm still used? ›

The United Nations banned napalm usage against civilian targets in 1980, but this has not stopped its use in many conflicts around the world. Although the use of traditional napalm has generally ceased, modern variants are deployed, allowing some countries to assert that they do not use “napalm.”

Who took the famous Vietnam War photo? ›

On June 8, 1972, Nick Ut, a Vietnamese photographer for the Associated Press, snapped one of the most iconic images of the Vietnam War.

What are the 14 diseases associated with Agent Orange? ›

Here are the 14 health conditions associated with Agent Orange exposure as of 2020:
  • Chronic B-Cell Leukemia.
  • Hodgkin's disease.
  • Multiple Myeloma.
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Prostate cancer.
  • Respiratory Cancers.
  • Soft tissue sarcomas.
  • Ischemic heart disease.
Jan 2, 2022

Where was the most Agent Orange sprayed in Vietnam? ›

Phu Cat Airbase

Over 3.5 million liters of Agent Orange were located on the Phu Cat base during the American war in Vietnam. Several areas of the Phu Cat base were found to have elevated levels of dioxin requiring remediation (above 1000 ppt in soil or 150 ppt in sediment).

How many Vietnam vets have died from Agent Orange? ›

The number of Vietnam veterans affected by the chemical Agent Orange is astonishing. Roughly 300-thousand veterans have died from Agent Orange exposure -- that's almost five times as many as the 58-thousand who died in combat.

How many US helicopters were lost in Vietnam? ›

In total, the United States military lost in Vietnam almost 10,000 aircraft, helicopters and UAVs (3,744 planes, 5,607 helicopters and 578 UAVs ).

How many b52 bombers were shot down in Vietnam? ›

Only one other B-52 tail gunner had scored a successful kill against a Vietnamese fighter, though more than 30 B-52s had been shot down throughout the conflict.

How old was the youngest soldier killed in Vietnam? ›

On June 7, 1969, Bullock was killed by small arms fire while on night watch at An Hoa combat base. He was 15 years old and had been in-country nearly one month. He was the youngest American service member to be killed in the Vietnam War.

Why do Vietnam vets not talk about the war? ›

Civilians do not like to hear about killing, and combat soldiers do not want to talk about it. There is no euphemistic way to talk about killing, and there is no eloquent way to describe a violent death. So, in order to cope, soldiers have invented their own private language to talk about these subjects.

Why was Vietnam so hard on veterans? ›

Perhaps the cruelest aspect of the war was the treatment of the returning soldiers. Unlike the hero status given to the returning soldiers form World War II, the soldiers that served in Vietnam were portrayed as baby killers, psychos, drug addicts and war mongers.

What did Vietnam soldiers do for fun? ›

Music and theatre were also popular diversions. Brass and pipe bands, choirs and concert parties toured camps and put on shows for the troops. Other soldiers entertained their mates with impromptu musical, pantomime and comedy performances.

What was the deadliest month in Vietnam? ›

The May Offensive was considered much bloodier than the initial phase of the Tet Offensive. US casualties across South Vietnam were 2,169 killed for the entire month of May, making it the deadliest month of the entire Vietnam War for U.S. forces, while South Vietnamese losses were 2,054 killed.

Which president started the Vietnam War? ›

The major initiative in the Lyndon Johnson presidency was the Vietnam War. By 1968, the United States had 548,000 troops in Vietnam and had already lost 30,000 Americans there. Johnson's approval ratings had dropped from 70 percent in mid-1965 to below 40 percent by 1967, and with it, his mastery of Congress.

Who did the most combat tours in Vietnam? ›

He earned 38 military decorations during his career, and has been called the most decorated U.S. soldier of the Vietnam War.
...
Jorge Otero Barreto
Years of service1959–1970
RankSergeant First Class
Unit101st Airborne 25th Infantry 82nd Airborne 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team
7 more rows

Who is the youngest Vietnam vet still alive? ›

List of the 4 Youngest Vietnam Veterans
  1. Oliver Stone. Age: 75. Born: 09/15/1946. Hometown: New York City.
  2. Tom Selleck. Age: 77. Born: 01/29/1945. Hometown: Detroit, Michigan. ...
  3. Bob Kerrey. Age: 78. Born: 08/27/1943. Hometown: Lincoln, Nebraska. ...
  4. Jorge Otero Barreto. Age: 84. Born: 04/07/1937. Hometown: Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. ...

Who was the last person killed in Vietnam? ›

Charles McMahon (May 10, 1953 – April 29, 1975) and Darwin Lee Judge (February 16, 1956 – April 29, 1975) were the last two United States servicemen killed in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. The two men, both U.S. Marines, were killed in a rocket attack one day before the Fall of Saigon.

How old would a Vietnam veteran be today? ›

▶ Vietnam Veteran ages range from 55 to 97 years old.

What did U.S. soldiers call Japanese soldiers? ›

In WWII, American soldiers commonly called Germans and Japanese as krauts and Japs.

Are there still U.S. POWs in Vietnam? ›

As of 2015, more than 1,600 of those were still “unaccounted-for.” The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) of the U.S. Department of Defense lists 687 U.S. POWs as having returned alive from the Vietnam War.

How many U.S. soldiers are still missing in Vietnam? ›

Research and Investigations

U.S. POW/MIA investigators rotate into Hanoi on a continuous basis to pursue leads associated with the remaining 1,246 Americans still unaccounted for in Vietnam. A research effort continues in the Ministry of National Defense (MND) central archives.

What branch of military sees the most combat? ›

This, of course, fluctuates given international issues at any given time. The Army is known as the largest military branch. Therefore, they are more likely to be present in a lot of combat operations. Because of this, Army infantry will see a lot of combat.

What was the life expectancy of a door gunner in Vietnam? ›

Over 10% of Vietnam casualties were helicopter crew members, and most of those were the door gunners that protected the helicopter, its crew, and its transports, from their exposed position. The average lifespan of a door gunner on a Huey in Vietnam was just two weeks.

What was the life expectancy of a helicopter pilot in Vietnam? ›

“They were short of gunners on helicopters, because the life expectancy was somewhere between 13 and 30 days,” he said. “I had no experience behind a . 60 caliber machine gun.”

What was the bloodiest day in Vietnam? ›

November 19, 1967 was one of the bloodiest days for American troops in the Vietnam War.

Who is the oldest living Vietnam veteran? ›

Richard Arvin Overton
DiedDecember 27, 2018 (aged 112 years, 230 days) Austin, Texas, U.S.
AllegianceUnited States
Service/branchUnited States Army
Years of service1940–1945
7 more rows

What army unit lost their colors? ›

In a ceremony attended by Battalion leadership, Soldiers, veterans, and family members of the 2nd Engineer Battalion the Battalion's Colors were ceremonially burned. The tradition of burning the colors stems from the events that took place during the Battle of Kunu-Ri during the Korean War.

What are iconic photos? ›

Iconic photographs are "(1) recognized by everyone within a public culture, (2) understood to be representations of historically significant events, (3) objects of strong emotional identification or response, and (4) regularly reproduced or copied across a range of media, genres, and topics" (Hariman and Lucaites 37).

What was the first war to be photographed? ›

Introduction. The Civil War was the first large and prolonged conflict recorded by photography.

How did photography influence the Vietnam War? ›

While the Vietnam War raged — roughly two decades' worth of bloody and world-changing years — compelling images made their way out of the combat zones. On television screens and magazine pages around the world, photographs told a story of a fight that only got more confusing, more devastating, as it went on.

How many Vietnam War veterans are still alive today? ›

"Of the 2,709,918 Americans who served in Vietnam, Less than 850,000 are estimated to be alive today, with the youngest American Vietnam veteran's age approximated to be 60 years old."

What is the most famous photo of all time? ›

Nasa's “Man on the Moon” photo was named the most famous image of all time, followed by “Lunch atop a Skyscraper,” which showed eleven ironworkers sitting on a steel beam 260 meters above the ground in Manhattan, New York City in 1932.

What is the most important photo ever taken? ›

King's College archivist Geoff Browell says: "Photo 51 was taken by Rosalind Franklin and Ray Gosling in the Biophysics Department here in 1952. It is arguably the most important photo ever taken.

Why did they not smile in old photos? ›

The Tradition of Not Smiling for Painted Portraits

This early custom was because wide-mouthed, toothy grins were considered inappropriate for portraiture. Even in other kinds of old paintings, a person's wide smiles were often associated with madness, drunkenness, or otherwise informal, immature behavior.

Who was the first person to smile in a photo? ›

Willy is looking at something amusing off to his right, and the photograph captured just the hint of a smile from him. Willy's portrait was taken in 1853, when he was just 18.

What is the most famous picture from the Civil War? ›

1. The Dead of Antietam (1862)

Is Vietnam still communist? ›

Vietnam is a socialist republic with a one-party system led by the Communist Party. The CPV espouses Marxism–Leninism and Hồ Chí Minh Thought, the ideologies of the late Hồ Chí Minh. The two ideologies serve as guidance for the activities of the party and state.

Did napalm girl survive? ›

Though officially titled "The Terror of War," the photo is better known by the nickname given to the badly burned, naked 9-year-old at its center: "Napalm Girl". The girl, since identified as Phan Thi Kim Phuc, ultimately survived her injuries.

Which is correct Vietnam or Vietnam? ›

In short, while all three spellings are correct, in most English speaking countries, Vietnam is preferred, though the "Viet Nam" spelling is used by the UN and the Vietnam government itself.

Who did the Viet Cong fear the most? ›

TIL That during the Vietnam War, the most feared soldiers by the Vietcong were not US Navy Seals but Australian SASR. The VC referred to SEAL's as "The men with Green faces" whereas SASR known as "The Phantoms of the Jungle.

Are there still U.S. POWs in Vietnam? ›

As of 2015, more than 1,600 of those were still “unaccounted-for.” The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) of the U.S. Department of Defense lists 687 U.S. POWs as having returned alive from the Vietnam War.

Why do Vietnam vets not talk about the war? ›

Civilians do not like to hear about killing, and combat soldiers do not want to talk about it. There is no euphemistic way to talk about killing, and there is no eloquent way to describe a violent death. So, in order to cope, soldiers have invented their own private language to talk about these subjects.

Videos

1. 42 Vietnam War Incredible Photos in Color - Declassified pictures
(Rare Pictures in Color - The Official Channel)
2. 50 RARE AUTHENTIC PHOTOS THAT SHOW A SIDE OF VIETNAM WAR YOU DONT USUALLY SEE PART 2
(History Photos Gallery)
3. Veterans Stories of Service in the US Army Security Agency
(Door County Library)
4. 20 Powerful Vietnam War Photos
(Top 20 Historical)
5. 40 PHOTOS of the 𝗩𝗜𝗘𝗧𝗡𝗔𝗠 𝗪𝗔𝗥 💥😞
(40 Historical Files)
6. 25 Photos Of The Vietnam War You Must See!
(Powerful History)

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